IMPROVING LIVES with Traffic Data

IMPROVING LIVES with Traffic Data

As our streets and highways become more congested, traffic data collection and analysis are becoming even more important. Before we can design any solutions, we must first understand the problem. This is where real-life data and analytics come into play. Continuing our commitment to providing quality, common sense solutions to our clients, TREKK has recently adopted traffic data collection technology that allows us to safely and accurately collect traffic data at intersections and along roadway segments. The video data collected by this camera technology equips us with the information needed to determine a cost-effective and feasible solution. It also eliminates the need for manual traffic counts, keeping our staff safely out of the way of traffic, especially during peak periods. How We Collect Data Traffic cameras are installed onto existing signs, poles or posts along a roadway network to record data for a specific amount of time. Once mounted, the cameras telescope upward for a birds-eye view of the location. They can record anywhere from a few hours to capture peak hour volumes or an entire 24-hour period. The cameras can withstand and record during inclement weather including strong winds, rain, and snow. Traffic data can be collected along a roadway segment to measure roadway volume or at intersections to gather turning movement counts. We can also collect time-to-travel data to determine the length of time it takes vehicles to travel from one intersection to another. The cameras have a visibility limit of 170 feet during both day and night, which is adequate for most intersections. Larger intersections or roundabouts may require two cameras to collect data. From Video...
Finding the Forest

Finding the Forest

Finding the Forest In my career, it’s sometimes difficult to “see the forest for the trees.” As an Engineering Technician, I am typically in front of my computer, configuring the details of a plan set that a contractor will be able to read, use and, eventually, build and make a reality. I am continuously focused on the minute details of the coordinates of “proposed” versus “existing” infrastructure, ensuring that the elevations of specific items are correct, and that we have specific notes, detailed diagrams and the area data covered correctly. Through all of these details, it is easy to forget that every project I touch improves communities, lives and the wellbeing of individuals everywhere. I had the good fortune to be reminded of this recently. I’m part of a small team currently working on a project with the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority to design and coordinate the rehabilitation of 20 bus stops throughout the greater Kansas City area. The bulk of the design has been balanced between Mike Shirk as the Project Manager and Engineer and me as Engineering Technician, with the assistance of Brooks Taylor, another Engineering Technician, and our highly-skilled GIS Team. Mike has been wonderful in empowering me to take a lead in the design and helped me through the process. At first, I struggled with this project and its simplicity. I found myself wanting and needing my coordinates and elevations, my multitudes of details, and struggling to design what I thought was just a simple concrete pad. It was during a field check with Mike that the importance of this project set in. We...